Claude Shannon

What we talk about when we talk about digital

Suppose I’ve composed yet another brilliantly astute tweet but before I dispatch it to my tens of followers I ask you to guess it. Not just the undoubtedly on-point sentiment but every single word. I’ll make it easy and just limit it to lowercase letters but I’ll also need some special characters like # and @, quote, full stop, comma and space. So let’s say … Continue reading What we talk about when we talk about digital

Learning Tech Labs – Technology in Schools

The most recent Learning Tech Labs event took place on February 10th in Google, Dublin. Its focus was firmly on secondary education and technology. As was noted by an attendee, the distinction between technology education and technology in education is often muddled. The first speaker of the evening was Claire Conneely, Google Ireland’s Education Programme Manager who discussed Google’s education programmes for students and teachers and their commitment to interest in … Continue reading Learning Tech Labs – Technology in Schools

Make It New: The History of Silicon Valley Design

In “Make It New: The History of Silicon Valley Design” author Barry M. Katz chronicles hardware and software development from the under documented perspective of designers who “waged an ongoing guerilla campaign to to gain a hearing from the engineering overlords”. Within the book there are two examples of early computer design and the hardware and interaction design they changed . It’s tempting to think of hardware and … Continue reading Make It New: The History of Silicon Valley Design

A Brief Beginner’s Guide to Binary

We all know computers deal in 1s and 0s but it’s not always that clear what binary is and why it’s even used at all instead of good old decimals. Wouldn’t it make more sense to write eleven as just 11 rather than 01011? The binary system was in existence well before its application to computer science and came to us from George Boole via Leibniz who … Continue reading A Brief Beginner’s Guide to Binary

As We May Think

As part of the Coursera HCI course I’m taking I read over Vannevar Bush’s 1945 essay ‘As We May Think’ and it’s quite possibly the most prescient thing I’ve read. I encountered it first in college in relation to Ted Nelson’s Project Xanadu. In the essay Bush explores the possibility of non-linear indexing of information (the ‘memex’ – a name he admits coining at random) … Continue reading As We May Think